The invention of the alkyne class.

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definition

Alkynes are a class of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons that contain one or more carbon-to-carbon triple bonds and have the empirical formula CnH2n-2[1]. Alkynes are used to make polymers such as vinyl chloride, to make many organic solvents and also used for artificially ripening fruits.

INVENTION

The German chemist August Wilhelm von Hofmann invented[2] the alkene class in 1866. Prior to his proposition, the names of hydrocarbons consisted of the scattered use of the Greek feminine patronymic suffixes “-ene”, “-ine”, and “-one” meaning “daughter of”. Hofmann suggested systemising the nomenclature by using the vowels “a, e, i, o, u” to create the suffixes “-ane”, “-ine or -yne”, “-one”, and “-une”. Only the first three came into use[3].

INVENTOR

Here is a photograph[4] of August Wilhelm von Hofmann:

[ux_image_box img=”1190″ image_width=”40″ link=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_Wilhelm_von_Hofmann” target=”_blank”]

1818-1892

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sources
  1. https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/alkyne
  2. https://web.archive.org/web/20120414184114/http:// www.chem.yale.edu/~chem125/125/history99/5Valence/Nomenclature/Hofmannaeiou.html
  3. https://web.archive.org/web/20120202091842/http:// www.chem.yale.edu/~chem125/125/history99/5Valence/Nomenclature/alkanenames.html
  4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_Wilhelm_von_Hofmann