The discovery of haemin.

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Table of Contents
definition

Haemin is a porphyrin chelate of iron, derived from red blood cells; the chloride of haem[1].

DISCOVERY

The Polish anatomist Ludwik Karol Teichmann-Stawiarski discovered haemin crystals in blood in 1853. The method[2] is as follows:

• Acetic acid was added to dried blood.
• The solution was dried at a temperature of 25-62.5 degrees Celsius.
• Upon observation through a microscope, rhombic crystals of haemin
were seen.

Below is a photomicrograph[3] of haemin crystals:

[ux_image id=”677″ width=”80″ link=”https://vademecummicroscope.com/2018/04/29/wait-is-that-blood/” target=”_blank”]

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discoverer

Below is a portrait[4] of Ludwik Karol Teichmann-Stawiarski:

[ux_image_box img=”680″ image_width=”50″ link=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwik_Teichmann?wprov=sfti1″ target=”_blank”]

(1823-1895)

[/ux_image_box]

sources
  1. https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/hemin
  2. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25803677?seq=1#metadata_info_tab%20_contents, pages 395-397.
  3. https://vademecummicroscope.com/2018/04/29/wait-is-that-blood/
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwik_Teichmann?wprov=sfti1